Segmentation Study of Anti-Americanism

I found this off the Wilson Quarterly.

The most benign, “liberal ­anti-­Americanism,” thrives in some former colonies of Great Britain, the authors write. These and other advanced indus­trialized communities mourn America’s failure to live up to its high principles. They see democratic America as a hypocritical, self-­inter­ested pow­er, for example, supporting dictatorships or ad­vo­­cating free trade while protecting its own farmers from ­competition.

Social ­anti-­Americanism,” found most commonly in Scan­dinavia and Japan, decries Uncle Sam’s relatively unfettered capitalism and ­go-­it-­alone exceptionalism in international ­affairs.

Sovereign-­nationalist ­anti-­Amer­i­canism” is particularly strong in China, where the history and aspirations of the ancient kingdom combine to trigger virulent outbursts in response to any perceived lack of “respect.”

Elitist ­anti-­Americanism” is not confined to French intellectuals, but they form its epicenter. Americans, Katzenstein and Keohane write, are viewed by this small but vocal group as uncultured materialists without concern for the finer things of ­life.

Legacy ­anti-­Americanism” lingers in societies such as ­Iran, where American intervention in the past sup­ported despised rulers.

The most dangerous form is “radical ­anti-­Americanism,” whose adherents see America as so de­praved that it must be destroyed. This brand of hatred animates suicide bombers and the remaining ­Marxist-­Leninist rulers. Only America’s renunciation of its ­political-­economic system and culture can rectify the situation, the radicals ­say.

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